The Eye of the Fish

Maximus
March 22, 2011

Full Moon

About this chap Ring. Bit of a fuss going on at present. Last couple of nights: very very full moon. Largest it has been since 1918 or some such?

Something to do with the closest orbit to Earth that it has been on for quite some time – a super moon, or a perigee moon appearing concurrent with a full moon – and gorgeous it was too. No sign of ‘loonies’ about, nor werewolves….

but the thing that many are wondering is: did the Sunday night earthquakes in Canterbury have anything to do with the moon? Anything to do with Ring’s predictions? He had forecast a large quake in Canterbury during the weekend – and so everyone took off out of town, ending up in places as out of the way as Twizel.

Of course, wouldn’t you know it, Twizel had 2 earthquakes instead. And then, when people had got back to Christchurch, there were another 3 aftershocks in ChCh, one quite sharp.

Now, I know that doesn’t prove anything – the believers will still believe, the non-believers will still not believe. All I want to know is that, seeing as the whole world had a full perigee supermoon last night, closest orbit to the earth since way back when, how come only Canterbury gets the quakes? A fault in the Ring theory perhaps?

minimus
22 - 03 - 11

just read your post and then came across this
http://www.scientificamerican.com/blog/post.cfm?id=signs-signs-everywhere-signs-seeing-2011-03-13

Maximus
22 - 03 - 11

Well that’s a bit freaky – here I was debating the worthyness or otherwise of Ken Ring and you put me onto a website debating the existence of God ! I find it all a little creepy that children are being tested to believe in supernatural forces, although its good to see that they are not necessarily sucked in at a young age. The last paragraphs of the post seem to have it right:

“When the emotional climate is just right, there‚Äôs hardly a shape or form that “evidence” cannot assume. Our minds make meaning by disambiguating the meaningless. This sign-reading tendency has a distinct and clear relationship with morality. When it comes to unexpected heartache and tragedy, our appetite for unraveling the meaning of these ambiguous “messages” can become ravenous. Misfortunes appear cryptic, symbolic; they seem clearly to be about our behaviors. Our minds restlessly gather up bits of the past as if they were important clues to what just happened. And no stone goes unturned. Nothing is too mundane or trivial; anything to settle our peripatetic thoughts from arriving at the unthinkable truth that there is no answer because there is no riddle, that life is life and that is that.”

Seamonkey Madness
22 - 03 - 11

http://www.fastcompany.com/1737710/the-supermoon-and-japans-89-magnitude-earthquake

Greenwelly
22 - 03 - 11

“Supermoons” are more common that you think,

It is the largest moon in the last 18 years (not since 1918), the one in 1993 was larger.

But there was a “near super” moon in 2008,

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2011/16mar_supermoon/